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#25992 - 03/14/10 06:20 PM chance of passing it on?
Ing Offline
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Registered: 03/14/10
Posts: 11
Hello everyone.

I have ichthyosis, and have had it all my life. I am not 100% sure but I do believe it is a "midly-severe"(if that makes any sense) case of ichthyosis vulgaris. Now, from what research i've done It is an autosomal domintant disorder which basically means if any one of my children were to get that gene from me, they would have it. My mother had a mild case of it and I believe my father was a carrier for it. All of my research states that even though its autosomal there is only a 50/50 chance of the child being affected by it. But if I got the gene from both my mother and father wouldnt that increase it to a 100% chance? I'm sure you understand my concern, while this is not a life-threatening condition it is something i would rather suffer through alone then have any possible children suffer through as I had to. The reason I'm unsure about this is that some research I found also said that there is some evidence that suggests that if you have both genes for ichthyosis rather than just one you will have a severe case as I believe I do.

Perhaps someone with a similar situation could shed some light on it for me?

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#25993 - 03/14/10 09:25 PM Re: chance of passing it on? [Re: Ing]
Ing Offline
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Registered: 03/14/10
Posts: 11
oh goodness, after looking it back over the word "carrier" seems to be a rather poor choice. What I meant was that I thought my father might have had a mild case of it like my mother. However, I contacted him few hours ago to ask and he said that his family had shown no signs of it and he had no symptoms either.

So, this question has more or less answered itself

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#26005 - 03/16/10 09:37 PM Re: chance of passing it on? [Re: Ing]
Promiseland Offline
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Registered: 07/30/08
Posts: 160
Common for many who suffer from Vulgaris to have carriers in both sides of the family. Let us assume one parent has symptom and the other does not, but extended family of second parent shows symptoms. Some of the children of these two people may have mild symptoms and some may have severe symptoms. If those with mild symptoms have spouses whose families have no symptoms, their children may show no symptoms at all.

If you have severe Vulgaris, which is rare, you may have bad scaling that could lead to prickly itch. I do not know if your severity would or would not increase the chance of you passing the condition on to your offsprings.

Seems to me all you could do is find a spouse who shows no symptoms to maximize your chance of having children with no ich. Easier for you to do this in a large and cosmopolitan city rather than a small town or village where ich may be more prevalent.


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#26006 - 03/16/10 09:48 PM Re: chance of passing it on? [Re: Promiseland]
Ing Offline
Member

Registered: 03/14/10
Posts: 11
yes, thank you, you reaffirmed my thoughts. my ichthyosis is not severe in the truest sense. My skin always has been noticably scaly and you can see skin cells that peel off or can be scratched off causing a sort of "dandruff" effect. However the symptoms have lessened since i have passed the age of puberty. I have a sister who has a much milder case of ichthyosis and it is almost non-existent with her so i can only assume that mine is considered somewhat severe. As for the prickly itch, it most commonly happens when i go from a cooler to a slightly warmer temperature and my body has to adjust.

My main concern is not necessarily that my children might inherit the condition, it is that they might have a more severe case like myself. While of course 20 years ago the information regarding ichthyosis wasn't necessarily the best for treating it but it is still not something I want for them. But since I obviously have no control over that particular matter i shall simply have to trust in God and cross that bridge when I come to it.

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#26011 - 03/17/10 02:48 PM Re: chance of passing it on? [Re: Ing]
Promiseland Offline
Member

Registered: 07/30/08
Posts: 160
If you have the "mild" scale symptoms you have described, then I assume you could sweat and sweat quite profusely, but may itch prior to sweating on some occasions if the scales are bad enough.

But you most certainly have a measure of control. Severity of vulgaris symptoms fluctuate with the seasons. The hot and humid summers allow for sweating and the sweating in turn exfoliates the skin, allowing for more sweating in a virtuous cycle. On the other hand, cold and dry winters inhibit sweating, and the build up of scales go on unchecked, creating more and more discomfit, especially the risk of prickly itch, the next time you need to sweat. Then, it logically follows that you and your family should find the most tropical locale you can feasibly move to for you to live and work. This ideal locale will also allow for your children the chance to grow up with minimal symptoms, even if the condition is severe. In fact, the more severe the Vulgaris symptoms, the more important it is to live and work in the tropics.

Other variables that would impact quality of life would be exposure to air conditioning (not good at all) and alcohol consumption (also not good). Air conditioning takes away the exfoliating benefit that hot and humid weather provides, and alcohol dehydrates you.


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#26017 - 03/18/10 04:06 PM Re: chance of passing it on? [Re: Promiseland]
Ing Offline
Member

Registered: 03/14/10
Posts: 11
well fortunately for the alcohol I have decided not to touch it even before i thought about that so that works to my advantage.

As for the climate, I intend to move to japan eventaully which has similar season temperatures to my home state except the winters are supposed to be slightly warmer and the summers will be slightly cooler but still hot and humid compared to what most people are used to. From what i've researched it sounds like it could be a more suitable climate for my condition and with a little care during the winter months it should be manageable at the very least.

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#26021 - 03/18/10 10:02 PM Re: chance of passing it on? [Re: Ing]
Promiseland Offline
Member

Registered: 07/30/08
Posts: 160
Interesting. Japanese culture I do not think would be very amenable to people with rare medical conditions with physical symptoms such as ich. Never heard of any Japanese with vulgaris at all. Good luck to you.

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#26022 - 03/18/10 10:38 PM Re: chance of passing it on? [Re: Promiseland]
Ing Offline
Member

Registered: 03/14/10
Posts: 11
I don't necessarily think the physical appearance will necessarily be a problem since the more noticeable areas are the legs rather than the upper body and since japan is also an island nation being so close to the sea should help with the condition on its own. While i've never actually heard of a Japanese having ichthyosis i don't see necessarily how it could not happen as I dont believe one particular genetic race has an advantage against it over others. And conditions like asthma appear over there and people with ichthyosis can tend to have conditions like asthma as well.

Worst case scenario even if it is looked upon differently that will already be expected for me since I am a foreigner and japan is a very homogeneous country. I think that even if that is the case people will come to accept it at least to an extent as they have done here.

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#26023 - 03/18/10 11:15 PM Re: chance of passing it on? [Re: Ing]
Ing Offline
Member

Registered: 03/14/10
Posts: 11
hmm, after a quick bit of research there are some cases of ichthyosis in japan and there is even a group called the "japanese families of ichthyosis" which meets yearly in a reunion

So, the situation is probably not much different then here, few people have heard of it but most dont question it once you explain what it is.

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#26024 - 03/18/10 11:20 PM Re: chance of passing it on? [Re: Ing]
Promiseland Offline
Member

Registered: 07/30/08
Posts: 160
I do not believe the incidents of the more common forms of ich, such as vulgaris or X-linked are evenly distributed through all population groups. The extremely rare and severe forms of ich may pop up in any population group because of genetic mutation. But that is not the case with Vulgaris.

Vulgaris is a lot more prevalent in subtropical and tropical climates because the symptoms are less severe in those climates and people who suffer from it can pass the genes on through the generations. On the other hand, someone with severe vulgaris and a sweat disorder would have a lot of trouble surviving, much less procreating, if he is from the northern latitudes and from a cold and inhospitable climate. I would say in centuries past infants with severe ich of any kind may be exposed by their families.

In some coastal provinces of southern China Vulgaris is prevalent to an extent that is unimaginable in the West. I would not be surprised if it originated centuries ago in China.

If you are American and live in the States, demographic statistics may say that probability that you are of northern European descent would be high. However, I do not think so.

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