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#20158 - 05/25/01 01:50 PM Alternative Therapies in Medical Journals
Laura Phillips Offline


Member

Registered: 07/31/08
Posts: 12
Loc: Detroit, MI
I've just been doing a search of MedLine, looking for new stuff, or stuff I overlooked before. I must say, I was both pleased and surprised to see how much has been published in the past 18 months or so in well-respected dermatology journals about the importance of investigating alternative therapies. I hope that happens, and you see alternative therapies subjected to the same type of scientific scrutiny and study as "traditional" medicines (so we know more about them, why they work, which ones really do and don't work, etc), and that more dermatologists become more savvy about alternative therapies.

I can't put the full text of the articles I found here, however, here's an abstract from a British Journal of Dermatology article that I thought was particularly interesting. You might want to order the full article for yourself, or go to your local library and look it up sometime.

Adverse Effects of Herbal Drugs in Dermatology
Ernst E
Br J Dermatol. 2000;143:923-929

Herbal treatments are becoming increasingly popular, and are often used for dermatological conditions. Thus dermatologists should know about their potential to cause adverse events. This review is aimed at addressing this area in a semisystematic fashion. Some agents, particularly Chinese herbal creams, have been shown repeatedly to be adulterated with corticosteroids. Virtually all herbal remedies can cause allergic reactions and several can be responsible for photosensitization. Some herbal medicines, in particular Ayurvedic remedies, contain arsenic or mercury that can produce typical skin lesions. Other popular remedies that can cause dermatological side-effects include St John's Wort, kava, aloe vera, eucalyptus, camphor, henna and yohimbine. Finally, there are some herbal treatments used specifically for dermatological conditions, e.g. Chinese oral herbal remedies for atopic eczema, which have the potential to cause systemic adverse effects. It is concluded that adverse effects of herbal medicines are an important albeit neglected subject in dermatology, which deserves further systematic investigation.



[This message has been edited by Laura Phillips (edited May 25, 2001).]

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#20159 - 06/19/01 05:58 PM Re: Alternative Therapies in Medical Journals
Laura Phillips Offline


Member

Registered: 07/31/08
Posts: 12
Loc: Detroit, MI
well, I happened upon some more stuff in my recent readings.

The FTC recently released the results of their "Operation Cure.All" which was aimed at inappropriate internet marketing of supplements. You can read their entire release for yourself at http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2001/06/cureall.htm

The Wall Street Journal did an article last week on Operation Cure.All, and chose to highlight colloidal silver. That really caught my attention, because I know a number of people have talked on this board and our old board about using colloidal silver (with miraculous success) to treat ichthyosis. The FTC's release talks about colloidal silver in particular in several places, but here's an excerpt of what the WSJ had to say:

"Ingesting silver, including colloidal silver , does have at least one documented effect. It can permanently change the color of skin. Tiny bits of silver build up and dye the flesh a shade of blue-gray, a condition known as argyria. The amount of discoloration varies from person to person and darkens with exposure to sunlight. It isn't known to lead to anything more serious, but it can't be reversed.

The FDA letters warn silver promoters that they must change their sites, but only about 20% have done so, the agency says.

Kurt Wilson is chief executive of Survival Enterprises, a Couer d'Alene, Idaho, business that sells colloidal silver products. When the FDA sent him a warning, he made plans to move health claims about his product to the Web site of a friend based in Western Samoa. He says U.S. regulators will have no authority over the site, even though he plans to continue shipping the product from his Idaho base. "It has saved too many people, so I'm not going to pull it off the market," Mr. Wilson says. Both the FDA and FTC say they will in fact still have authority over Mr. Wilson's claims.

Rosemary Jacobs, a 58-year-old retired teacher in Vermont, developed argyria after a doctor gave her colloidal silver nose drops for allergies when she was a teenager. She once was featured in the New England Journal of Medicine, and she has started her own Web site to warn others about using the silver suspensions. "I have a big mouth and I am angry," Ms. Jacobs says. "I'm doing it because I'm so angry that people can get away with it."

Check out the WSJ, 6/14, for the full article.


You guys know that I'm just as interested and open-minded as anyone about alternative therapies for treating ichthyosis. Just be sure you do your homework, and you know exactly what it is that you're getting into when you try something "alternative." Tell you what...I don't think I'll ever try colloidal silver or certain Chinese herbs on myself.

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#25710 - 01/09/10 09:03 PM Re: Alternative Therapies in Medical Journals [Re: Laura Phillips]
Balder Offline
New member

Registered: 10/17/09
Posts: 2
I agree! It`s important to do your homework before starting new cures. When it comes to colloidal silver there are a few things to say. First of all the fact that in the process of making it you can not use product made from ordinary tap water. The water have to be destilited or else the product will get "polluted". Agyria occure when the silver particles gets to big to pass through your venes. I know people who have used colloidal silver daily for more than ten years. And they still have a fresh skin colour and never been sick.

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#26078 - 03/26/10 12:24 AM Re: Alternative Therapies in Medical Journals [Re: Balder]
grassak Offline
Member

Registered: 11/27/09
Posts: 42
I drink colloidal silver for over 8 months but for other reasons not for ichthyosis ... didnt see any changes on my skin ... also no sign from argyria ... but I hope I will stop using it shortly smile smile but if you try dont use the home made ... there are very good silver water on the market ... I use one which got silver medal in Geneva for new products

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#26310 - 05/01/10 04:40 PM Re: Alternative Therapies in Medical Journals [Re: grassak]
92jd016 Offline
New member

Registered: 05/01/10
Posts: 3
Loc: rocky mnt. west
a friend of mine told me that when he was a child they experimented with the stuff that they stick medical machine monitors to the skin with and when they peeled off the contacts his skin was perfect underneath. you would have to check with a doctor to find out what it is and then experiment on yourself to see if it works or even if it is the same stuff, this was about thirty years ago when he used this stuff, the formula may have changed over the years. he now uses a rather obscure dry skin cream, and claims it is the only thing he has used that works. i don't want to advertise for them, but drop me a line and i'll tell you their web page address.

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#27513 - 03/23/11 03:25 AM Re: Alternative Therapies in Medical Journals [Re: 92jd016]
shawn Offline
New member

Registered: 03/22/11
Posts: 2
Hello, I just found this forum yesterday and have been reading the posts since then. I am glad to join such a great community and I learned a lot. Sorry for my poor English as I am not a native English speaker.

I have moderate to severe IV and my family members and relatives had no or varying severity of IV, on my mother's side. I had signs of IV since early childhood. When I was in China, I didn't know of any effective treatment of the symptoms and suffered a lot. I saw some advertisement of treatment for ichthyosis in China but did try any as they all looked suspicious. I got to know Lachydrin/AmLactin after I came to the US in 2001 and it has been a life saver. I use it once a day and only have mild symptoms now. My daughter is 3 and has no signs of IV yet. However, I suspect that she has IV as she had dry skin, eczema and scaling on her scalp when she was little. I applied lots of cream on her everyday.

I am planning to try some oral medicine that I found online a few days ago. The medicine will not cure the disease but is claimed to prevent new buildup of scale and relieve all the symptoms of IV (softer palm, lighter skin tone, hair growth, etc) or x-linked. The medicine is like tea and is Chinese medicine. The symptom will come back unless you continue having the medicine roughly twice a week. The doctor that developed this medicine had ichthyosis himself and have been using it for himself and his son for over 10 years. He also treated over 1000 patients. I am impressed with the effectiveness of the medicine from the feedback of many his patients. I haven't tried it yet but will keep you posted if I do try it.

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#28097 - 11/29/11 07:29 PM Re: Alternative Therapies in Medical Journals [Re: Laura Phillips]
Anonymous
Unregistered


What is this Chinese medicine you speak of shawn? Have you tried it? Can you give us some more information?

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