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#14224 - 06/28/07 12:17 PM High Fevers
jrmiss86 Offline
Member

Registered: 06/07/05
Posts: 378
Loc: Marlton, NJ, USA
For as long as I can remember whenever Alex (2 years) gets the least little bit sick he gets these alarmingly high fevers. They have been getting worse. Yesterday for example he came down with a small summer cold as did the baby and I. He is the only one who got a fever and it was very high, like 102 or 103. He has gotten as high as 104 in the past and the only thing that brings it down is both tylenol and motrin together. He of course ten gets dehydrated and his skin becomes sandpaper. could this be related to the xli and any suggestions on how to keep him better hydrated?

Thanks Heather
_________________________
Heather
Mom to:
Alex (xli and Kallmans - 2/3/05)
Liz (3/16/07)

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#14225 - 06/28/07 01:04 PM Re: High Fevers
Hearsay Offline


Member

Registered: 01/16/04
Posts: 1449
Loc: Richmond, VA, USA
Of course it is related. Ichthyotic skin is an imperfect barrier to moisture loss. When he gets sick, part of his immune response triggers fever, which makes his body more efficient at making infection-fighting white blood cells. This has the side effect of opening up capillaries near the skin surface, which means more blood/water reaches the skin. The water leaches out of the blood, but the skin can't keep it in, so you get dehydration.

Have you tried tepid-water baths to treat the fever? You can also offer Gatorade/Powerade if he's not a water drinker, or if he won't take Pedialyte, which is ideal but expensive. Finally, undress down to the diaper as much as possible. There's not much else you can do aside from an IV.

One good thing is that as kids get older, they get fewer really high fevers.
_________________________
Jennifer
Ichthyosis-en-Confetti Type 2
Husband, Nathan - 10, Elliot - 7, Oliver - 4, all affected.
I also have an unaffected daughter, age 8.


email: jennifer at confettiskin dot com
facebook - find me on "ichthyosis mommy spot" or "friends of ichthyosis"

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#14226 - 06/28/07 02:02 PM Re: High Fevers
Angel24755 Offline

Member

Registered: 05/13/05
Posts: 633
Loc: PA
The high fevers are not related to the ichthyosis. In fact, fevers of 102 or 103 are not really considered alarming or high in small children. A fever of 103 in a child and a fever of 103 in an adult are very different things. It is perfectly normal for children to have fevers that reach 102 or 103. Most pediatricians don't even recommend calling or going to a doctor until the fever is 104 AND won't come down with medication. A fever is simply the body's way of fighting off illness. Children also get fevers more often than infants and adults which might explain why he is the only one that got a fever (not to mention that everyone's body responds differently). The dehydration is definitely a part of the Ichthyosis as his body is already struggling to keep everything hydrated and a fever just makes it harder.
Cade gets a fever every single time he gets sick. It is just his body's response. Leah doesn't react the same and neither does Grey. They are all different. In fact, Leah probably gets the fewest number of fevers. Grey on the other hand doesn't have to deal with the terribly dry skin during a fever like Cade and Leah do. The only thing you can do is double up the lotions when he's sick and give him more fluids. As long as his fever is manageable with medication and it doesn't go over 104 there is really no cause for concern.
Cade and Leah don't sweat so we try to manage a fever from the second it starts. We keep a watchful eye on them, give them tylenol and motrin (alternated), give them plenty of water, and keep them well lotioned.
Lisa
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#14227 - 06/28/07 02:03 PM Re: High Fevers
jrmiss86 Offline
Member

Registered: 06/07/05
Posts: 378
Loc: Marlton, NJ, USA
thanks,

we have been giving him gatorade, and fortunatly he will drink water, just not enough. For some reason with Alex the baths do not bring down the fever, I wish they did, I feel like I am drugging my poor kid just to get his fever down, but If I don't give him both the tylonel and motrin then he gets really high, and I am always worried that it will trigger a seziure.

Thanks again, My husband went out last night and bought a big jug of Gatorade so I have been keeping a cup of that availale at all times, so at the moment he seems to be doing better.

On a side note, he starts preschool in the fall, any ideas on how to lessen the bugs he is going to catch from being in school for the first time? I have a feeling that we are going to be spending a lot of time sick next winter with him starting school and it being Liz's first cold season.

Heather
_________________________
Heather
Mom to:
Alex (xli and Kallmans - 2/3/05)
Liz (3/16/07)

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#14228 - 06/28/07 02:21 PM Re: High Fevers
Angel24755 Offline

Member

Registered: 05/13/05
Posts: 633
Loc: PA
If it makes you feel any better, febrile seizures occur in less than 5% of children and are almost always harmless.

As far as preventing illness in school, it's not going to happen lol. Your best bet is to work with him now, get him in the habit of washing his hands often and try to teach him to keep his hands away from his face. You could always talk with his teacher, explain that illness makes his skin drier and hope for her cooperation. She could have hand washing time as the children arrive and once during the day to minimize the germs. You can provide some sort disinfectant spray in hopes that the teacher will spray common items down every so often. Anti-viral tissues are nice too. Kids don't usually wash their hands well or enough and they also have a tendency to touch their faces often. It's not going to be easy to prevent illness in a school setting.
Lisa
_________________________

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#14229 - 06/28/07 02:47 PM Re: High Fevers
Hearsay Offline


Member

Registered: 01/16/04
Posts: 1449
Loc: Richmond, VA, USA
Thanks for clearing that up, Lisa. I was referring to the dehydration as the related part, not the fevers, but now that I re-read what I posted, that wasn't really obvious.

To clarify:

ALL kids get fevers, especially when they are very young. Nobody panics until they hit 104+.

FEW kids get severely dehydrated from fevers.

MOST ichthyosis children get dehydrated from fevers or exposure to hot weather.
_________________________
Jennifer
Ichthyosis-en-Confetti Type 2
Husband, Nathan - 10, Elliot - 7, Oliver - 4, all affected.
I also have an unaffected daughter, age 8.


email: jennifer at confettiskin dot com
facebook - find me on "ichthyosis mommy spot" or "friends of ichthyosis"

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#14230 - 06/28/07 10:45 PM Re: High Fevers
sideshowbob Offline
Member

Registered: 10/23/05
Posts: 209
Loc: Midwest, USA
Here is where I get confused:

1. Our daughter doesn't sweat
2. When she gets too hot, she overheats and can't cool down
3. A fever is her body heating from the inside
4. As her body heats up, it can't cool itself down

so....

Why don't the fears of overheating apply to a fever? I know that kids can get fevers up to 105 before you panic, but what about Ichthyosis kids who don't sweat? That was my major concern this spring when A got the flu -- how do I keep her comfortable, keep her from overheating, and keep her from dehydrating when she won't take enough liquids in?
_________________________
4 year old daughter with CIE

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#14231 - 06/29/07 12:07 AM Re: High Fevers
jrmiss86 Offline
Member

Registered: 06/07/05
Posts: 378
Loc: Marlton, NJ, USA
Thanks again for all the replies. I feel better knowing that I don't need to worry about the seziures as much. I probably worry more than I should, but as much as he thinks he is a big boy he is still really little, he is only two, and I still think of him as my baby, so when he gets so sick I feel so helpless.

It is funny that you said that that most docs don't recommend calling until 104+, my doctor has always said that I should call when he gets a high fever because he could have an infection. At this point I have stopped calling because I got tired of dragging a sick child to the dr. just so they could tell me it is a virus and there is nothing they can do.

oh well you live and learn I guess, thanks again.
_________________________
Heather
Mom to:
Alex (xli and Kallmans - 2/3/05)
Liz (3/16/07)

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#14232 - 06/29/07 01:14 AM Re: High Fevers
Angel24755 Offline

Member

Registered: 05/13/05
Posts: 633
Loc: PA
<<Why don't the fears of overheating apply to a fever? I know that kids can get fevers up to 105 before you panic, but what about Ichthyosis kids who don't sweat? That was my major concern this spring when A got the flu -- how do I keep her comfortable, keep her from overheating, and keep her from dehydrating when she won't take enough liquids in?<<

In either situation (overheating or fever) you wouldn't want the child's temperature to go above 104. Most illnesses won't cause a temperature over 104 and when our children are sick and have a fever we are medicating them, giving them fluids, and working hard to cool them down. In hot temperatures outside, it is very easy for their temperature to get to a dangerous level quickly. When our children are playing in warm weather it is the outside temperature causing their body to overheat and not a virus that has limits to what it can do. Leah had a fever of 105 once when she was sick because we made the mistake of dressing her in fleece pj's after a bath and she climbed under fleece blankets to take a nap. I felt her and I knew right away we were in trouble. A few minutes outside in the cool air was all it took to drop her temperature down to 103. The point is that when our kids are sick we can't exactly prevent a fever AND the fever is beneficial to kill germs. In the case of playing outside, the high temperature isn't beneficial and you certainly wouldn't want your child's body temperature to be raised daily.
Lisa
_________________________

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#14233 - 07/03/07 06:22 AM Re: High Fevers
swebblie Offline
Member

Registered: 11/08/06
Posts: 48
Loc: Wollongong, Australia
Hi Heather,

I haven't said much on the board recently, but I feel that I really understand what you are worried about. Everyone so far has given you great advice and all I want to add is my experience and some information given to me.

My son who is now 4 years old has xli and when he was 1 and 1/2 he had his first febrile convulsion. Thankfully for us this happened in the Emergency department of our local hospital (we live 2 mins away). We took our son to the hospital at 11pm because we thought he had coughed up blood. The doctor looked at him and said that everything was fine and that he had an "unkown virus". The doctor washed his hands as we got ready to go home and then my son started seizing in my husbands arms. I don't know who was in more shock; us or the doctor. He just stood there watching while all these other doctors and nurses raced in and started attending to our son.

That was the first time and since then he has had three other episodes each with multiple seizures. We have been seeing a great pediatrician and after lots of different tests, it has been decided that my son has epilepsy and overheating or fever is a trigger for it.

So we have now become "experts" at keeping our sons fever under control. Like the others have said you can't prevent kids from getting sick, but there are some things you can do. Everyone has suggested most of the things we do including the Gatorade. But I have some other advice that has been given to us.

1. make sure that the child is wearing few clothes.
2. Use drugs to control the fever. Especially at night.
3. Make sure that you don't make them shiver, as shivering will raise their temp even higher.
4. put on their favorite DVD and lay them on the lounge to watch it. (this was the hardest part as my son is a mover and shaker, even when he is really sick)
5. If a child seizes make sure they can't hit anything. Take them to the hospital straight after. If the seizure goes for longer then 5 mins ring an ambulance. In fact if it is their first seizure it is a good idea to ring the ambulance straight away.

And finally it is not how high the temp is that causes a seizure it is how rapidly the temp rises. So even with a low fever it is possibly to have a febrile convulsion. Approximately three percent of children aged 6 months to 6 years have a convulsion when they have a fever or high temperature. The chance of the child having another febrile convulsion in the following year is 30%. (ie 70% don't have a second seizure). And the doctors suggest that they run in family's. So if you or your partner had one as a child, then your child has a higher chance of having one.
Sorry this is so long. Hope it helps in some small way.

Sarah [img]http://www.ichthyosis.com/ubb/smile.gif[/img]

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